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Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The “Bravos,” or “Braves,” as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. All photos by Lunae Parracho. —Reuters (26 photos total)
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2014/04/survival_in_the_amazon.html

Many indigenous groups, including the Huni Kui, Ashaninka, and Madija, live in villages in the Brazilian rainforest near the border with Peru. Over the past three years, the Ashaninka and Madija say that they have seen more and more incursions on their territory from uncontacted tribes, defined by Survival International as groups who have no peaceful contact with mainstream society. The “Bravos,” or “Braves,” as uncontacted Indians are called in the region, carry out raids on other villages, putting the communities along the Envira River on permanent alert. Leaders of the Ashaninka tribe have asked the government and NGOs for help in controlling what they consider an encroachment on their area by these uncontacted indigenous groups, stating that the movement of these other tribes is the result of pressure caused by illegal logging across the border in Peru. All photos by Lunae Parracho. —Reuters (26 photos total)

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2014/04/survival_in_the_amazon.html

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A Balinese man hits another with a burned coconut husk during the “Mesabatan Api” ritual a head of Nyepi Day in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia, on March 30, 2014. Mesabatan Api is held annually a day before the Nyepi Day of Silence, symbolizing the purification of the universe and human body through fire. Nyepi is a Hindu celebration observed every new year according to the Balinese calendar. The national holiday is one of self-reflection and meditation — activities such as working, watching television or traveling are restricted between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.(Agung Parameswara/Getty Images) 

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2014/04/nyepi-the-balinese-day-of-silence/100711/

A Balinese man hits another with a burned coconut husk during the “Mesabatan Api” ritual a head of Nyepi Day in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia, on March 30, 2014. Mesabatan Api is held annually a day before the Nyepi Day of Silence, symbolizing the purification of the universe and human body through fire. Nyepi is a Hindu celebration observed every new year according to the Balinese calendar. The national holiday is one of self-reflection and meditation — activities such as working, watching television or traveling are restricted between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.(Agung Parameswara/Getty Images) 

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2014/04/nyepi-the-balinese-day-of-silence/100711/

3 notas &

Mahmoud Hejran (2nd from left) and Zabih Hosseini (center), members of the Afghan band Tanin, play the guitar and sing as they travel back to their music studio after performing on a live TV program in Kabul on March 4, 2014. Despite decades of conflict in Afghanistan, and several recent militant attacks, the country’s capital Kabul is home to a vibrant youth scene of musicians, artists, athletes and activists. Shopping malls and cafes stand in the city, which is nonetheless beset by infrastructure problems and instability. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl) 

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2014/03/the-modern-face-of-kabul/100707/

Mahmoud Hejran (2nd from left) and Zabih Hosseini (center), members of the Afghan band Tanin, play the guitar and sing as they travel back to their music studio after performing on a live TV program in Kabul on March 4, 2014. Despite decades of conflict in Afghanistan, and several recent militant attacks, the country’s capital Kabul is home to a vibrant youth scene of musicians, artists, athletes and activists. Shopping malls and cafes stand in the city, which is nonetheless beset by infrastructure problems and instability. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl) 

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2014/03/the-modern-face-of-kabul/100707/